Interview on The Holistic Health Show

Dr. Kevin Conners was interviewed by the late Dr. Carl Helvie on his radio program, Holistic Health Show, in 2019. They discussed Dr. Conners’ approach to cancer which included nutrition and rife machines.

Dr. Helvie has since passed on. He was a very caring man and was always willing to talk to people with cancer diagnoses to share knowledge on alternative cancer treatments. He worked tirelessly to help cancer patients understand the holistic approaches available to them. He will be missed by many. We hope you enjoy this interview.

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Interview on The Holistic Health Show: Cancer & Rife with Dr. Kevin Conners

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Dr. Carl Helvie
I welcome you to the Holistic Health Show with Dr. Conners. And I look forward to hearing about your cancer clinic. Now, first, you believe that looking for the cause of cancer in your patients is important. Why is this so, and what tests do you use?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Well, thank you for having me first, Carl, I appreciate it. So, there’s always a cause to cancer. Cancer, as you know, is one cell starting a rapid replication phase, then reproducing more cells that are in a state of rapid replication. So something had to get in that cell and caused that to take place. Usually it’s some sort of toxic or maybe a virus or fungus or something like that. So looking for the cause is important because if you can come close to figuring that out and trying to treat that, then you’re going to have a better chance of preventing cancer in the first place or preventing spread. So that’s an important piece for what we do. For instance, if you look at the research for stomach cancer per say, the statistics show that, I think it’s 97% of stomach cancer is caused by H pylori, which is a bacteria that can reproduce strongly in the gut, can be part of our normal flora. It’s not supposed to be present in the stomach because of the stomach acid helps keep that at bay, but when we have a decreased stomach acid, H pylori can grow like crazy in the stomach. And once it gets into those cells that line the stomach, it could be and is the number one cause of stomach cancer worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. So, why don’t we look for causes of cancer in other places and treat that where with stomach cancer, they typically do treat the H pylori, but they tend to, and I’m talking about standard medicine, tends to ignore the cause of other cancers.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Do you use the cancer sensitivity test or have you used it at any time?

Dr. Kevin Conners
We don’t. We have some patients that use cancer sensitivity testing before they come to us. We use kinesiology, we use genetic testing to help to get to those pieces. We find that those are fairly successful for us helping narrow down our answers. Nothing’s going to be perfect. Nothing’s a perfect test. Even our gold standard tests aren’t perfect, but you try your best to get what you think is going to be the best for the patient.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Dr. Forsythe in Reno, who did a lot with alternative treatments and he used the cancer sensitivity at one point, but he’s backed off lab on it now. He says it’s not as effective as they thought it was initially.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Right, I actually spoke to another colleague of ours that actually shared with me a couple of years ago that Dr. Forsythe actually stopped using that test because he didn’t think the accuracy was up to snuff.

Dr. Carl Helvie
And, Dr. Sapa at the Acadia Clinic in Germany is on my cancer board. And he said that he had stopped using, or he’d never used it because he never thought that it was very effective. So, it’s something that at the time sounded really interesting and exciting, but I guess these things change.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Well, part of the problem is that what works in a person’s body is different than what’s going to work in a Petri dish. So, you hear on Facebook or something that XYZ nutritional thing kills 97% of cancer cells. Well, if you put bleach in a Petri dish with cancer, it’s going to kill all the cancer cells, but you can’t drink bleach. So, what works in a test tube doesn’t always work in the body. So it’s a little more complicated than that.

Dr. Carl Helvie
And what bothers me sometimes on Facebook is that they take the animal studies or the lab studies, and then start saying it kills cancer. Well, they haven’t reached the point of testing on humans yet. It’s just been tested on rats.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Right. You know, a mouse study doesn’t always equate to a human study for sure. Right.

Dr. Carl Helvie
You mentioned kinesiology testing in your diagnosing, and I thought that was interesting. Can you tell us a bit about that?

Dr. Kevin Conners
So, kinesiology testing is a form of muscle testing that we do in our office. I’ve been doing it for 35 years. It isn’t perfect. And it certainly is dependent upon the practitioner. So I would never defend all people who do kinesiology, it’s an art form that needs to be mastered. And some people find themselves to be good at it, some people really struggle with it. We’ve been confident. I believe it’s a gift and we’ve been confident that we’ve been successful with it, but again, there’s human error and everything, but it can help narrow things down.

Dr. Carl Helvie
I did a book recently to make money for my cancer foundation on preventing cancer. And I used dreams as a diagnostic tool because, in my case, when I had lung cancer in 1974, I went to the doctor because I had a dream that told me to go to the doctor and have x-rays. And I’ve known other people that had dreams like this. So I feel that even though it’s not accepted by traditional medicine, that there are those people that receive guidance through their dreams. So I included that. How are genetics related to cancer?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Well, there’s very few cancers that have a specific genetic cause. However, looking at a person’s genetic pathways can really help point to helping a person gain health, whether they have cancer or anything. So, there are tumor suppressor genes. Those are genes that we have in most of our cells, that if a cell goes into rapid replication, “cancer,” the tumor suppressor genes kick on and help kill that cell, that’s what your tumor suppressor genes are. And people can have defects in multiple tumor suppressor gene systems, and be more susceptible to getting cancer, so some familial cancers can be because familialy, you have inherited defects on specific tumor suppressor genes. Therefore your risk of a certain type of cancer can go up, that you inherit from your parents, but that’s still isn’t the cause. We understand the definition of cancer as cells that goes into rapid replication. A defect in a tumor suppressor gene is not going to cause a cell to go into rapid replication. However, a defect in tumor suppressor genes can inhibit the body’s normal defensive mechanism against a cell that does go into rapid replication. So therefore it’s a contributing factor to a person getting a diagnosis of cancer. So looking at those are important. There are also known tumor, oncogenes, which are genes that, if I have defects in this gene, it can actually increase my risk of cancer and their known supportive systems. So let’s say let’s use the example of curcumin active form of turmeric. Multiple studies have been done on that to help interrupt oncogenes. So if a person has defects that are oncogenes, that could increase their risk of cancer using the intervention like curcumin can help decrease one’s risk. But beyond the tumor suppressor genes and the tumor, oncogenes, it behooves us to look at other things like genes that control our detoxification pathways. So, remember we said cancer is rapidly replicating cells, what caused that in the first place? Well, it’s something that got inside the cell that interrupted that replication cycle at the nucleus and allowed rapid replication to take place. Well, how could that be? Well, it can be toxins that are not getting out of my body. So, I could eat really well and try to eat organic and stay away from additives, colorings, chemicals, toxicities. Regardless, we live in this world and we’re exposed to air pollutants, chemicals, you know, my shirt is not dyed with blueberries and there’s carpet on the floor and there’s gasification of different chemicals that I’m breathing in. And my liver is working over drive to try to get rid of all these toxins that I’m exposed to even if I’m trying to eat clean, live a clean life. So these liver detox pathways have to be healthy. So, if you look at, from a genetic standpoint, if I have defects on my cytochrome P4 50 detox pathways, I’m not going to be as fast of a detoxer as somebody who doesn’t have defects on those pathways. So, I think it’s beneficial to look at all those genes, as many as we know about at this time and see how we could possibly better support the pathways that I have issues with. So that’s what we try to do.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Then how important is nutrition in your protocol?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Nutrition is extremely important. So when you look at somebody with cancer, cancer has to have a fuel source because this is rapidly replicating cells, very high metabolic rate. It needs a fuel to continue to do that because you make energy to do what it needs to do to grow. So then you have to look at trying to cut off that fuel source. So cancer will commonly be fed through glycolysis, through breakdown of sugar. So looking at a person with a diagnosis of cancer should instantly cut way back on their sugar intake or cut back on their carbohydrates. But also cancers can be fed through proteins through amino acids, methiomine and glutamine and lucine. So looking at cutting back on animal proteins typically is what we look at too. So what we call a mixed diet, if I don’t know, how do I know if my cancer is fed mainly through glycolysis or mainly through proteins? Well, you could experiment and go on a more ketogenic type diet where you’re typically eating a little bit more protein and see how my cancer growth rate is going or vice versa, we could go on maybe a more juicing diet, so juicing might be a little bit higher in carbohydrates, but I’m gonna go more vegan with my diet and see how my cancer grows. We test for that. But, if you don’t know how your cancer is fed, it might be more healthy to go on a more mixed diet, stay low carb, but also semi vegan. And that tends to be good for a lot of people as well. The other thing about nutrition and diet is dairy. With cancer, most of our cancer patients, we take off dairy, try to get them off as much dairy as possible because you think of what dairy is, is to help a little baby grow to be an adult, right? Whether it be a 60 pound cow to a 1200 pound cow or a child into an adult. So it has a lot of factors that can stimulate growth rates. So we don’t want to be feeding growth factors to someone who has already has a growth factor problem that is cancer. So staying off dairy is a good idea as well.

Dr. Carl Helvie
When I had lung cancer, my doctor put me on a vegan diet and I stayed on that for two years, and it took two years before I was cleared, but I used all natural holistic intervention. So I didn’t do any chemo, radiation, or surgery. And that was back 40, well, it’d be 45 years, the 21st of this month.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Wow. Congratulations.

Dr. Carl Helvie
And I never had a recurrence. So I think that what my doctor recommended spoke well of his practice. I think in many ways he was way ahead of his practice because some of the research for what he did came out five or six years ago, but the medical profession closed him down years after I had treatments. And the ketogenic, I have interviewed some people that have had a lot of success with that. And I know Dr. Esslinger in Reno, at least when I talked with him last was using that in his treatment.

Dr. Kevin Conners
I just caution against thinking that only one way is the right way, right? Everybody’s different. Your cancer might be different. So experimenting with different types of diets is the best way to go.

Dr. Carl Helvie
That’s what I think too. And Dr. Gonzalez, when he was alive, he used the two types that were direct opposites. One was for meat eaters and the other was for the vegetarian, and that seemed to work. And I know he said that the vegan was better for those who had lung cancer, which is what I had. And that’s what I went on and for breast cancer, which is what Susan Summers had. And, and she went on that. So I think that the variety is probably better than saying everyone has to do a certain thing. And also Dr. Isaacs mentioned, when I talked with her, and she’s followed up, she worked with as you know, Dr. Gonzalez. But she says that they give some additional pancreatic enzymes that allows them to be a little more flexible with the diet than it was at the time that I treated.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Yeah. I know Dr. Gonzales and Dr. Isaacs, they do metabolic typing, which is something that you could do online too. It’s a series of, I don’t know, 400 or 600 questions that you go through to help decide what type of diet that you should be on. That’s a good way to help with your decision making process as well, but typically like lung cancer and colon cancers, there should be more likely that they’re going to be on a more vegan type diet. Brain cancer is going to be much more likely that a ketogenic diet is going to be better. So, doing a metabolic type diet or questionnaire can be helpful in determining that. And I agree with Dr. Gonzalez with enzymes. So, doing a Dr. William Kelly approach with high dose enzymes is one way to go, but just by getting some digestive enzymes in with each meal to all your food digest better, and then to do it off meal on an empty stomach to help you absorb those enzymes. So it can help eat up the lining around the cancer and it could be really helpful to get your immune system to it.

Dr. Carl Helvie
I use the wool, the MOGUS, but they’ve been either discontinued or banned or something. They’re no longer available in this country.

Dr. Kevin Conners
We switched to the U.S. enzymes now because they’re a fermented enzyme and we’ve had better success with a lower dose. I know dr. Gonzalez used to use the poor seed enzymes that had a very high dose. And sometimes if the person that’s really ill. It’s hard for them to take 75 capsules of something a day, it can be difficult to swallow.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Yeah. Then Dr. Conners, do you recommend immune builders to your patients?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Oh, absolutely. That’s a key piece because it’s your immune system that ultimately has to do the job to kill the cancer. So by changing your diet, you’re helping your immune system and you’re taking pressure off your immune system because a poor diet puts a lot of stress on your immune system. You’re firing an immune response against antigens foodborne antigens. So if you could call that whole response down, so your immune system can focus on killing the cancer, that’s essential, but you have to use immune boosting things. You could call them cancer killing nutraceuticals. People call them natural chemotherapies, but it’s really just things that are going to help boost that person’s immune system to help attack the cancer. There’s many different ones out there. And again, we test for what’s going to be best for the person so that they’re not on too many things.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Then one of your interventions is the Rife Machine. And how do you use this on patients, and how long does it usually take with the rife machine?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Rife machine is a therapy machine that helps, it’s a light frequency generator is what it is. And, with all our cancer patients, we send them home with their own rife machine programmed specifically for them and their cancer. And they use it at night. You could use it during the day too, but part of our philosophy is I want a person to go back to living and to get their mind off their cancer, and one of the things that can help that is making a big part of your treatment be done while you’re sleeping, you got to sleep anyhow. So we program it for use at night, a little bit different program every night of the week. And then with they’re typical daily processes, when it’s time to go to bed, they will put up the computer, they punch in the program and open it up. When it’s Tuesday, they’ll hit Tuesday and hit run, and they’ll close the computer up and go to sleep so they don’t get the EMFs through that, and they’re snuggling with the bulb next to them in bed while they sleep. And how long do they use it? A question everybody asks. How long do I have to use this? We just say, just keep using it forever. You don’t necessarily have to use it every night forever. Once you feel like you’ve kind of overcome your cancer, but you always have cancer cells in you, whether you have a diagnosis of cancer or not. So you want to be constantly conscious of taking care of yourself. And if you have the Rife Machine, continue to use it at night, it takes you 30 seconds, turn it on at night, keep using it. So we encourage people to continue using it.

Dr. Carl Helvie
So the Rife Machine then is very important in your protocols since you send the patients home with it.

Dr. Kevin Conners
It is. We’ve been using the rife since the first time I ever saw a cancer patient 20 some years ago. It’s partly because that’s something I was introduced to when I was in school. I was intrigued by the Rife Machine. I don’t know why. I know why now, I believe God put that on my heart, but I just thought, “oh, why did I get a rife machine so bad.” And actually, in my practice, I was a practicing chiropractor at the time, I had the Rife Machine I wanted picked out and the picture of it, the brochure up on the wall, and I had talked to the company several times and just never felt like I had permission to pull the trigger on it. And, one of my patients came in and she was in her late sixties, retired. She came to me and she goes, “I have to talk to you right now. And I brought her in a back room. She goes, “I found out I have breast cancer in both breasts.” And she said, “they told me if I don’t do chemo and radiation, I have three months to live.” And I literally just said, “you’re telling me this why?” And she goes, “No, you got to understand, I’m not going to do it. I nursed my friend through the chemo and I’m convinced she died of the chemo. It was five months ago. I’m not doing chemo.” She said, “if you can’t help me, I’d just rather die.” And that was just, those times, like you had a dream to go to the doctor about your lung cancer. And that was a time that I just felt like it was hearing the Holy Spirit, talk to you and to say, “it’s time, go get it.” And I just said, “Shar, just come back tomorrow, I’m going to go order a Rife Machine. Don’t even ask me what it is. I got to get it next day aired to me. So that was my start in my journey of trying to help people with this diagnosis. And she lived another 13 years and actually died of a heart attack. So, we’ve used the Rife with everybody since then. And so I really think it’s a key component because we’ve had patients that just refuse to change your diet, refuse to do anything else. And they did live way beyond what they were supposed to. So, I really think it’s a key component. I think it works better if you couple it with diet, nutrition and good supplements and good attitude. And, it’s a synergistic approach as you know.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Right, right. And I think it’s a wonderful story about how you started using it. I like that. And so you send the patients home with the Rife Machine and do you sell these to other people or do you know, reliable sources? Because like, you I’ve sort of wanted one for a long time, but I know that there’s a lot of them out there that aren’t really reliable. And then there was something I read called spooky or something or other that was being given away free, but I was a little leery of that. And so I was wondering if you sell them, uh,

Dr. Kevin Conners
Yeah, there’s only, there’s only two brands that I would put my name behind. Can I mention them on this? Okay, so the True Rife brand, we use that, and the GB 4,000, we use that. So those are the only two that I would really recommend. And if a person comes to us and they have any other kind and they say, “can you use this?” I say, “no, you need to get one of these two.” The GB 4,000 has benefits over the True Rife, then it has more power. The True Rife has more benefits over the GB 4,000 and that it’s much easier to program and get very specific with it. And it’s a much more user-friendly, it’s much more durable too. They just don’t break down as much. So there’s benefits to both. They’re both good machines. They’re both good technology. Do we sell them? Yes and no. We do sell programmed Rifes for people, but if a person’s like, “I just want to rife to use for my family” Then we, we just tell them to go to the company and buy them if they want it specifically programmed for their problem, that yes, we do the that. So, and that’s probably the number one reason why people seek us out is, is our historical use of the Rife machine. So we have patients from literally around the world because of the that. So we’ve shipped Rifes into many other countries to try to help people, typically with cancer or Lyme disease. Rife is a great tool to help your cells, health of your cells, the health of living things, to help kill viruses or bacteria or fungus, to help kill cancer. Let’s say my main problem is mercury toxicity, I would pick chelation therapy or something. The Rife is not really the tool for that, but it’s a tool that it has to be used properly. It’s not a magic wand

Dr. Carl Helvie
Yeah. A lot of people on Facebook are interested in that and the Rife Machine. And also there is a group that I was invited to join. And so I recently joined it and that’s all they do is talk about the Rife Machine. I don’t have a lot of free time to get there to check it out very much, but it’s something I’ve been interested in for a long time. It’s the same as the Bemer. And we’ll get to that with the PEMF shortly, but the Bemer was something that I had wanted for a long time. And then I broke down two years ago and got the Bemer I use. So that is helpful. Then you use other interventions, like the Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy, the Hypothermia, the PEMF therapy, Light Beam Generator, S-E-Q-E-X therapy and others. And I wasn’t familiar with the light beam and the SEQEX therapy.

Dr. Kevin Conners
So the SEQEX is equivalent to Bemer, it’s a low frequency PEMF, but it’s very similar to the Bemer. The only the advantage that the secrets has over the Bemer is that you can program it specifically for a frequencies. That’s the only advantage, but otherwise it’s almost identical as far as the gouse output of the Bemer.

Dr. Kevin Conners
The Light Beam Generator is another form of Rife, but it’s set frequencies that you can’t program. So it’s only set on a human body frequency, so that would be more beneficial for lymphatic detoxification. So it would help get lymph moving. That’s what the Light Beam Generator would be good for. If somebody was said, “oh, I have cancer, I’m thinking of buying a Light Beam Generator, should I?” That would not be my first pick.But it has some benefits to it. Then the PEMF that we use is a pulse brand, which has a high frequency. PEMF, a high impulse PEMF, it’s very strong. It has advantages over the Beamer and SEQEX for certain things. They’re just really different tools, so you’d kind of use them a little bit differently depending on what you’re trying to achieve.

Dr. Carl Helvie
I know Dr. Vickers at the Gerson clinic in Mexico uses the Bemer

Dr. Kevin Conners
The Bemer, like the SEQEX, I think the advantage of that is that the PEMF isn’t going to kill cancer cells, but it helps helps rejuvenate your own cells, helps open up your cell membranes, it helps detoxification. One of the biggest benefits of the PEMF is that it helps bring cell membrane charge back. And that’s something that you can measure with different instrumentation to see what yourself charges at, and you see people that are no more ill, have a much lower cell charge, and PEMF is really essential in helping boosting that and helping cell membrane health.

Dr. Carl Helvie
You mentioned detoxing, which is another important aspect. Can you tell us then about, you’re detoxing part of the protocol?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Whenever you make any lifestyle change, I mean, detoxing is something your body is doing constantly or you would be dead. So that’s the main purpose of your liver is helping clean out poisons from your blood and your kidneys as well. So, it’s those pathways that can become overwhelmed that then decrease my rate of detoxification. I always say that your toxic load is really your level of toxic burden. How many toxins you’re exposed to either breathing them in, eating them or putting them on your skin minus your level of detoxification, your rate of detoxification. So if your rate of detoxification is not exceeding your toxic load, then you’re going to have a toxic burden, these toxins that are going to have to settle somewhere. They won’t stay in your blood, or you’ll be poisoned.

Dr. Kevin Conners
So there’ll be pushed to your extracellular spaces or within the cells themselves. And that’s where they can cause problems. So you want to support the detoxification pathway starting at the end point. So, in your liver, you have phase one, phase two, phase 2.5, and phase three of how you get rid of poisons. So you want to support all those phases. And then to get more specific when you look at a person’s genetics, you want to support the pathways that you have defects on. Let’s say for instance, the cytochrome P450 pathway and the PON1 pathway or the NAT pathway. If I have defects on my PON1 pathway, I want to use specific nutrition that has some research data that will support the PON1 pathway or if I pull stuff out of my cells and it circulates back into my bloodstream, and I can’t get it out of my liver, well, I can make myself more sick than I was before. So you want to start at the drain point, you can say, and the drain point could even be further down. If a person’s constipated, they’re going to be reabsorbing those toxins. So you got to make sure their bowel habits are up to snuff, using coffee animals tf you have to, to help the liver and help with constipation issues, supporting those specific genetic pathways, supporting phase one, two, 2.5 and three. And then start helping support cellular detoxification, and that’s where the Rife can come in, that’s where the Bemer type machines could come in to help with cellular detoxification.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Do you advocate the Sauna at all?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Absolutely because the sauna helps bypass the liver and kidney basically because you’re using the skin as your portal of detoxification. So it’s excellent. We really push people to sauna if they can. It just takes one more pressure off of your liver.

Dr. Carl Helvie
You mentioned earlier about the different ways that you diagnose, and you mentioned it almost was like an approach of guidance that you receive. And I love that you include the spiritual aspects because I believe that the holistic approach is the approach that will prevent recurrences. So can you tell us about this aspect of care that you incorporate, the spiritual aspect?

Dr. Kevin Conners
Well, regardless of a person’s faith, and we’re not purposely trying to proselytize anybody to my Christian belief, but you have to have a level of desire to get better. I just think with any disease process… So I have a diagnosis of cancer. You have to be introspective enough to go, “huh? Is it something in a psyche that was at least a part of the cause? Was it, you know, repressed thoughts or suppressed past trauma, is it current, emotional stress that I’m dealing with?” You have, you have to ask those tough questions of yourself and be introspective enough to be honest with yourself, to get into a healthier place. And from our Christian belief, I believe you need to ask God those things, ask the Holy spirit to reveal to you. Like the Bible says, “Lord, if there be any wicked way in me, please tell me, show me.” Because sometimes our flesh could easily cover it up in a lot of ways. So we need guidance to have that be uncovered. And that’s the benefit of honest friends and a multitude of counselors around you that could maybe reveal things in you that you don’t see yourself. So being introspective I think is important, but also on that same side, be careful not to be too introspective. We can easily go into the blame game, where we blame ourselves and kind of beat ourselves up as well. And that, depending on your personality type, that could be the problem right there too. And then the other big thing that we try to share our patients is that most people, when they get a serious diagnosis, they go through different phases of grief you could say. I really believe, doing this for as many years as we’ve done this with as many patients as we’ve had, the ones that can get to the point of, “well, this is a blessing too. And praise God for my cancer because, if it wasn’t for my cancer, I wouldn’t look at life the way I’m looking at it right now, I wouldn’t value every sunrise, I wouldn’t enjoy my grandkids the way I’m enjoying the right now, I wouldn’t… on and on like that. I think the least historically in my practice, the people that get to the point where they’re not mad at the cancer anymore. You see these bumper stickers that say “cancer sucks” or worse than that language. I know you have to kind of go through that maybe, but I think you have to come out the other side of that and go, “there was a purpose in this too, and I can see the good in this as well.” And those are the people that we’ve seen do the best and have the best quality of life through their cancer as well. Because if you’re just going to be angry and bitter because you have cancer and die in that state, I don’t think that was good for anybody. So, I think that’s important. So we try to encourage people and everybody’s got to walk their own walk through that, but we really try to encourage people through that.

Dr. Carl Helvie
I know exactly what you’re talking about because I went through the same process and came out the other side a much more positive, much more optimistic, grateful, et cetera, et cetera. And that’s partly where I got interested in the holistic approach. But prior to that, I had worked with the agric Casey readings and friends with the Casey family and used to volunteer as the nurse for camp because I was teaching at the university and I was off summers. So I go to the camp, and I got to know a lot of the Casey readings. But the research now, again, is showing so much like being positive, being optimistic. There’s a big thing on gratitude. There’s a big thing on forgiveness. And one thing that I found when I was researching my last book was that some of the research shows the effect of the attitude and of forgiveness on the body because the research now shows that it causes chronic anxiety and leads to a depletion of the killer cells so you’re less able to fight. And 60% of all cancer patients have a problem with forgiveness. Another one is optimism. That affects, I think if I remember right, it’s the CA 125 protein, that is one of the markers for ovarian cancer, it affects that.

Dr. Kevin Conners
And colon cancer as well.

Dr. Carl Helvie
And so the research is beginning to come out, showing how the spiritual, what I call spiritual. I think all of these are spiritual. I don’t think it’s religious. I think it’s non-denominational, but it’s a spiritual aspects of care that has been ignored for so long. And so I was excited when I saw that you were involved in including that as part of your protocol.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Yeah. I think it’s essential

Dr. Carl Helvie
Can you tell us about, are you in-patient, out-patient? What is the process, does the patient come and stay a few days and then take things home and work and come back?

Dr. Kevin Conners
We have a couple of different programs. Most of our patients will come here to Minnesota for two days. And some people will spend a week. Some people will spend longer. We have some variable options. We treat everybody individualistic in that way, but most people will be here for what we call a two day intensive where we could get most of our testing done. If they want to stay longer for the therapies that we have, that they maybe can’t get in their area. Lots of times when people come from out of the country, they’ll stay much longer. And then they go home with a Rife. And that’s what makes us really different than most other clinics is that they’re going to home with the main tools because I don’t think you can be cured in three weeks at a center. I think it’s mostly what you do at home. So, you go home with the most important thing, the Rife, I think. And we also have a program where some people just can’t travel or they hate to travel. We actually have staff that will come to your house. So nearly every week, one of my lead practitioners is off to San Diego or off to Santa Barbara or wherever and spending two to three days in that person’s house doing most everything that we do in the office, they bring machinery with them. And that’s been really a blessing to a lot of people too. And again, they leave the rife machine. They still do most of the testing and such. So we have people that choose that, that’s a little bit more expensive because of the cost of us coming there, but whatever works. Sometimes it’s better to get out of your environment and come someplace else to get a fresh start. Sometimes it’s hard for people to travel and they’re too ill to travel too.

Dr. Carl Helvie
And do you include the family in some of this?

Dr. Kevin Conners
You have to, so that’s absolutely essential because you need that support system. And sadly, I talk about the spiritual side. Sometimes it’s the lack of that support system or the lack of support of their support system. That can often be a piece of the cause of the person’s illness. So, sometimes our role morphs in to trying to help counsel family in how to be the best support for the patient. But the family has to be a part of that caregiving process. I think it’s healthy for them as well to learn how to best help somebody else. There can be a healing process to that too.

Dr. Carl Helvie
That’s wonderful. I know I took a group of students to the University of West England in Bristol. This was back in the nineties, and we went to a cancer center where they brought the families there for a week I think it was and oriented the families to everything that they were providing with the patient. And that was the first time I had seen that in operation, and I thought it was a wonderful idea. Is there anything else you’d like to say before we look at any services, products, books, your website, and so forth?

Dr. Kevin Conners
It’s just that, we try to have, you know, I feel like what we do is a ministry. We have to charge for our service because I have staff to pay and bills to pay, but our information, we try to give as much away as possible. I offer my book as a free download, we have probably 400 videos on YouTube, we have 300 plus maybe 400 blog pages with valuable information, lots of them with videos on them, hundreds of pages of website and other books on Lyme and auto-immune diseases as well that are mostly free downloads as well. So we’re trying to encourage people. We get people many times will call us, they’re living on $700 a month, social security, they don’t have money for anything. We just try to, at least get on our newsletter list and give you a bunch of self-help, download our book for self-help things you can do. There’s so much you could do by just changing your outlook and attitude and perspective of life and dealing with any serious disease.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Yeah, if you can also tell us your website.

Dr. Kevin Conners
It’s Conners clinic, C-O-N-N-E-R-S clinic, Conners clinic.com or you go to Connersclinic/books, where you can download our book for free, but on our website, you’ll see the links to the books. You’ll see just a bunch of information on everything that we spoke about today. And I like to make videos because, I guess if I had another life to live, I’d be a teacher, I like to teach. So, I feel like I go to a seminar and I learn something, I think, “well, how can I teach other people so they can be helped by this too?” So we try to, anything I learn, to pass it on. I just feel like that’s my role and my obligation. So stay tuned with us and keep up with our newsletters to learn as much as you possibly can. Just like with your podcast, like this, it’s fantastic for people.

Dr. Carl Helvie
And that’s a wonderful role to play Dr. Conners. I admire that very much, and I appreciate so much you taking the time to talk with me because it’s good to know what’s going on out in the real world. The listeners are very interested in this and some of them, you know, I get a lot of people that come to the podcast from other countries where they don’t have quite the advantages that we do. And so they try to make, do with what they have. So I appreciate this very much, and I hope to talk with you again in the future and see what updates you have.

Dr. Kevin Conners
Thank you, dr. Carl, appreciate all you do and how much you’ve spent a whole lifetime helping people.

Dr. Carl Helvie
Thank you.