Our Plea for Intimacy

My book, “Cancer can’t kill you, if you’re already dead” is a rather strange title for a book. One might think, “what do you mean ‘already dead’, how is that giving me hope?” Others might criticize the initial portion crying, “cancer took my mother and my uncle and now it’s attacking my body, how can he say that cancer can’t kill when I witnessed it firsthand?”

Believe me, I’m not trying to be callous or super-spiritualize the matter of such serious concern. I understand, firsthand, the shock, disbelief, anger, grief, and acceptance that are often classified as the stages of the loss of control one experiences with a serious illness. That’s exactly the point. How does one whom professes to belong to Jesus Christ, “not grieve as do the rest who have no hope,” (1 Thessalonians 4:13) and what does this even mean?

We are all about hope but it is about hope that is properly placed. We want to hope for healing, for desires, for peace and all things that make us happy. These are good and justified, yet they are self-centered. Is it okay to want a new car and better job? Of course. Our heavenly Father wants us to ask Him for all that we need. We should ask for healing, pray for healthy marriages and Godly children. However, we must guard ourselves from expecting that we can manipulate God to provide what we think we need, even when that thing is life itself.

I believe the greatest error one can make is to settle for such little of God. We seek Him in times of trouble; we ask for miracles to overcome obstacles and believe this to be the ‘higher life’. Prayer has become a beggar’s cry as we fall well short of intimacy with our Creator. People profess to be Christians because they prayed a prayer, were dunked in water, and adhere to a belief yet are neither hungry nor thirsty after Truth. Download the book and Read more…